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Former World Champ Roger Mayweather dead at 58

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Former World Champ Roger Mayweather dead at 58

Mark Robinson -Matchroom Boxing

Former World Champ Roger Mayweather dead at 58

One of the popular characters of lighter-weight boxing in the United States in the 1980s and 90s, and the uncle of a famous fighter, Roger Mayweather, died on Tuesday at age 58.

Mayweather, who was a two-division World Champion, but who also trained Floyd Mayweather Jr. during his rise to superstardom in the 2000s had apparently been in ill-health for several years.

TMZ sports confirmed the story Tuesday afternoon:

Mayweather, known as “The Black Mamba” early in his career for his long, lethal straight right hand, first won a World Title as a Super Featherweight in just his 14th Pro fight. That’s when he knocked out Sammy Serrano in an upset San Juan, Puerto Rico, in January of 1983.

Hear Colonel Bob Sheridan and THE Larry Holmes on the TV play by play of Mayweather’s booming KO in the eighth round.

Mayweather successfully defended the title twice more by knockout over the next year before fellow American Rocky Lockridge defeated him in a surprise devastating KO. It came in just one round of their national network TV bout on “NBC’s Sportsworld” from Beaumont, TX in a battle in February of 1984.

Re-live the upset here:

Mayweather finally worked his way back to a title shot against WBC 130 lb. Champion and future Hall-of-Famer, Julio Cesar Chavez, but he also stopped him on a TKO in the second round in July of 1985.

Mayweather then won five of his next six fights, which put him in the ring with another late-legend, Pernell “Sweet Pea” Whitaker, who defeated him by 12-round decision for the NABF lightweight championship in March of 1987.

Finally, Mayweather broke through again, as WBC 140 lb. Champion defeating Rene Arredondo by a savage KO in the sixth round at the L.A. Sports Arena on November 12th, 1987. He used his lethal right hand for the first and the third and final knockdowns, as referee Lou Filippo didn’t bother to count on the third one scoring the TKO:

 

And, from their Mayweather took on the persona of the “Mexican Assassin,’ as he time and again defeated Mexican fighters in the late 80s in the early 90s. Mayweather would often come to the ring in a Mexican sombrero and taunt the opponents like a professional wrestling villain.

He also won a famous November of 1988 bout with Vinny Pazienza by 12-round decision. However, in May of 1989, Chavez got some revenge on the “Assassin” and beat him for a second time, when Mayweather couldn’t answer the bell for the 11th round.

Like so many fighters from the 70s and 80s, Mayweather continued to fight on, while in need of money well into his mid and late 30s. This included suffering a decision loss to Kostya Tszyu in June of 1995 for the IBF Jr. Welterweight title at age 35.

He then fought seven more times all the way up until May of 1999 winning his last fight as a welterweight against Javier Francisco Mendez. Mayweather retired with a 59 – 13 pro career record.

He then transitioned into being Floyd Mayweather’s chief cornerman after Mayweather had a falling out with his father, Floyd Sr., throughout the 2000s. Roger was training his nephew and in the corner for his wins over the likes of Arturo Gatti, Zab Judah, Oscar De La Hoya, Ricky Hatton and “Sugar Shane” Mosley during that time.

Floyd Mayweather obviously rose to the greatest heights in boxing and finished ultimately with a 50 – 0 record and is destined for the international Boxing Hall of Fame.

Mayweather Jr., had confirmed that in recent years Roger Mayweather was an ill health and suffering from memory loss. At this time there’s not been a cause of death given.

T J Rives

A veteran broadcaster of over 25 years, T.J. has been a fight fan longer than that! He’s the host of the “Big Fight Weekend” podcast and will go “toe to toe” with anyone who thinks that Marvin Hagler beat Sugar Ray Leonard or that Tyson, Lennox Lewis or Deontay Wilder could have beaten Ali!

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